Class 12 : Review Of Python Basics

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Class 12 : Python

Python Basics
Data Types
String
List
Tuple
Dictionary
Flow of Execution
Mutable and Immutable Types
Type Casting

Class 12 : Python Revision MCQs

Revision Tour MCQs

Class 12 | Revision Tour : Operators

By: Archana Shukla and Rajesh Shukla

Comparison operators:(==,!=,>,<,>=,<=,)

OperatorMeaningExample
>Greater than –
True if left operand is greater than the right
x>y >>>x=37
>>>y=28
>>>print(x>y)
True
<Less than – True if left operand is less than the rightx<y>>>x=10
>>>y=20
>>>print(x<y)
True
==Equal to – True if both operands are equalx==y>>>x=8
>>>y=9
>>>print(x==y)
False
!=Not equal to – True if operands are not equalx!=y>>>x=8
>>>y=9
>>>print(x!=y)
True
>=Greater than or equal to – True if left operand is greater than or equal to the rightx>=y>>>x=9
>>>y=8
>>>print(x>=y)
True
<=Less than or equal to – True if left operand is less than or equal to the rightx<=y>>>x=8
>>>y=9
>>>print(x<=y)
True

Logical operators: (and, or, not)

OperatorMeaningExample
andTrue if both the operands are truexandy>>>x=6
>>>y=8
>>>print(x>3 and y>5)
True
orTrue if either of the operands is truex or y>>>x=6
>>>y=8
>>>print(x>3 or y>10)
True
notTrue if the operand is false (complements the operand)not x>>>x=2
>>>y=3
>>>print(not(x>y))
True

Identity operators:(is, is not)

“is” and “is not” are the identity operators in Python. They are used to check if two values (or variables) are located on the same part of the memory. Two variables that are equal does not imply that they are identical.

Example:

>> x=5
>>> y=5
>>> print(x is y)
True
>>> print(x is not y)
False

Example:

x3 = [1,2,3]
y3 = [1,2,3]
print(x3 is y3)

# Output: False

print(x3 is not y3)

# Output: True

Note : Both x3 and y3 are list. They are equal but not identical. Since list are mutable (can be changed), interpreter locates them separately in memory although they are equal.

Membership operators (in, not in):

“in” and “not in” are the membership operators in Python. They are used to test whether a value or variable is found in a sequence (string, list, tuple, set and dictionary).

Example:1

x = ‘Hello world’
print(‘H’ in x)
# Output: True
print(‘hello’ not in x)
# Output: True
print(‘w’ in x)
# Output: True
print(‘Hello’ in x)
# Output: True

Here, ‘H’ is in x but ‘hello’ is not present in x (remember, Python is case sensitive).

In a dictionary we can only test for presence of key, not the value.

>>> y = {1:’a’,2:’b’}
Here 1 is key and ‘a’ is the value in dictionary y.
Here 2 is key and ‘b’ is the value in dictionary y.
We can check for key and not value.

>>> print(1 in y)
True
>>> print(‘a’ in y)
False

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